OncoSec Medical Reports Positive Preliminary Efficacy Results from Phase II Study of ImmunoPulse in Metastatic Melanoma Patients

95 Percent of All Treated Tumors Demonstrated Response to ImmunoPulse Therapy

SAN DIEGO – November 15, 2012 — OncoSec Medical Inc. (OTCBB: ONCS), a company developing its advanced-stage ImmunoPulse DNA-based immunotherapy and NeoPulse therapy to treat solid tumors, announces positive preliminary results from a Phase II trial investigating the use of ImmunoPulse in metastatic melanoma patients at the 6th World Meeting of Interdisciplinary Melanoma Skin Cancer Centres & 8th EADO Congress. This preliminary interim analysis of 13 out of 25 patients supports key findings from a Phase I trial suggesting that ImmunoPulse is able to induce regression or stabilization of distant untreated metastases following a single cycle of treatment.

A total of up to 25 patients with stage III or IV cutaneous and in-transit metastatic melanoma will be enrolled in this Phase II, single-arm, open-label and multi-center study. The trial was designed to assess local and distant objective response following treatment of cutaneous melanoma lesions with ImmunoPulse. As per the protocol, a preliminary interim analysis was scheduled upon completion of 50 percent enrollment in the study.

The purpose of the analysis was to confirm safety and efficacy observed in the Phase I study. At the time of this preliminary interim analysis, 13 patients were enrolled and treated. Thirteen subjects were evaluable at Day 39, nine at Day 90, and two at Day 180. Ninety-five percent of treated lesions demonstrated response at Day 39 (5 percent progressive disease, 14 percent stable disease (SD), 42 percent partial response (PR), 39 percent complete response (CR)). All treated lesions at Day 90 (5 percent SD, 50 percent PR, 45 percent CR), and at Day 180 (33 percent PR, 67 percent CR) demonstrated a response. At Day 180, two subjects were evaluable for the primary endpoint of objective overall response (ORR). One patient has a confirmed stable disease, and the second patient has a confirmed complete response of all treated and untreated lesions. Analysis of the safety data for the subjects analyzed confirms that intratumoral administration of DNA IL-12 with electroporation is safe and well-tolerated. No related adverse events reported were greater than grade 2, and were generally limited to transient pain related to electroporation treatment.

The preliminary results are being presented in a poster titled “Preliminary Analysis of a Phase II Trial of Intratumoral Delivery of Plasmid Interleukin-12  (pIL-12) with In Vivo Electroporation in Patients with Metastatic Melanoma.” Dr. Adil Daud, principal investigator and co-director of melanoma research at the University of California San Francisco School of Medicine, is co-author.

These data are also being orally presented at a parallel scientific symposium, hosted by OncoSec, titled “Electrogenetherapy: Intralesional Immunotherapy Approach for Skin Cancers Using Electroporation.” Drs. Adil Daud and Axel Hauschild will chair the event, which will be held on Thursday, November 15 from 6:00-7:00pm Barcelona time. The agenda is as follows:

– Application and Versatility of Electrogenetherapy – Dr. Richard Heller

– Clinical Experience: Case presentation and discussion of intralesional injection of

plasmid interleukin-12 with electroporation – Dr. Adil Daud

– Immune correlates and biomarkers: Immune related responses following intralesional injection of plasmid interleukin-12 with electroporation – Dr. David Weiner and Dr. Edward Cha

– Outlook on intralesional immunotherapies for the treatment of metastatic melanoma – Dr. Adil Daud

Punit Dhillon, President and CEO of OncoSec Medical, commented, “We are encouraged to have observed at least one complete response based on the evaluable patients that have met the primary endpoint timeline, and we will continue to follow this patient and the others to assess the durability of response. These data validate the results from the Phase I study and effort we have put into this program, while providing further evidence of the potential role of ImmunoPulse as a safe and effective option for treating this aggressive disease.”

Dr. Daud commented, “Preliminary results from this Phase II study appear to offer solid support to the earlier study indicating the efficacy of ImmunoPulse in treating metastatic melanoma. Enrollment in the study is ongoing and expected to be completed by the end of 2012. Long-term follow-up will assess durability of response.”

About the Phase II ImmunoPulse Study

A total of up to 25 patients with stage III or IV cutaneous and in-transit metastatic melanoma will be enrolled in this Phase II, single-arm, open-label and multi-center study. The trial is designed to assess local and distant objective response following treatment of cutaneous melanoma lesions with DNA IL-12 and electroporation with a primary endpoint of 24 weeks. One treatment cycle will consist of three treatments applied to up to four lesions on days 1, 5 and 8 with a maximum dose of 1.5 mg DNA IL-12 per treatment cycle. At 12 months, patients will be moved to the follow-up phase of the study and will be followed for up to five years for safety.

About Melanoma

Melanoma is the most serious form of skin cancer. If it is recognized and treated early, it is almost always curable, but if it is not, the cancer can advance and spread to other parts of the body, where it becomes hard to treat and can be fatal. While it is not the most common of the skin cancers, it causes the most deaths. The American Cancer Society estimates that at present, about 123,000 new cases of melanoma in the US are diagnosed in a year, resulting in approximately 10,000 deaths. Melanoma originates in melanocytes, the cells that produce the pigment melanin that colors our skin, hair, and eyes. The majority of melanomas are black or brown, but often they can also be skin-colored, pink, red, purple, blue or white. Currently, there remain few treatment options for patients with late-stage metastatic disease that can extend survival for the broad population.

Data Presented at 27th Annual Meeting of the Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer

SAN DIEGO – October 23, 2012 – OncoSec Medical Inc. (OTCBB: ONCS), a company developing its advanced-stage ImmunoPulse DNA-based immunotherapy and NeoPulse therapies to treat solid tumor cancers, announced positive preliminary results from a Phase II multicenter trial investigating the use of ImmunoPulse in Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) patients at the 27th Annual Meeting of the Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer (SITC 2012). The data suggest that ImmunoPulse, which locally delivers a DNA-based cytokine coded for the immune stimulating agent interleukin-12 (DNA IL-12) via electroporation, may elicit increased levels of IL-12 in the tumor microenvironment, which has the potential to result in a systemic immune response in treating aggressive cancers like MCC without serious adverse safety events.

The preliminary results were published in the Journal of Immunotherapy (35(9):721-791, November-December 2012) and will be presented in a poster titled “Intratumoral delivery of Interleukin-12 DNA with in vivo electroporation can lead to regression of injected and non-injected tumors in Merkel cell carcinoma: Results of a phase II study.” Dr. Shailender Bhatia, principal investigator and assistant professor at the University of Washington School of Medicine, is lead author and will be presenting the data.

This open-label study is evaluating the ability of ImmunoPulse to increase levels of IL-12 in the tumor microenvironment, in addition to the efficacy and safety of this treatment for patients with MCC. Preliminary results of this study have demonstrated that 100 percent (3/3) of subjects treated with at least one cycle of ImmunoPulse showed an increased level of IL-12 expression in tumor biopsy done three weeks post-treatment as compared to pre-treatment biopsy. Correlative analysis of limited samples demonstrated that at least one subject had increased CD8+ T-cells (also referred to as killer T-cells) in the tumors. Correlative studies of patient samples are ongoing.

Of the first five subjects enrolled, the overall response rate is 20% (1/5). One patient with baseline progressive MCC, despite multiple prior therapies (systemic chemotherapy, surgery, RT, IT interferon) has had a confirmed partial response (greater than 70 percent regression) that persisted for approximately eight months. The regression of injected as well as non-injected tumors, along with no new tumors over six months, suggest successful induction of systemic immune response from local intratumoral immunotherapy in this patient. This subject remains in the study and will receive a third treatment cycle.

Dr. Bhatia commented, “These preliminary results are encouraging, and we are looking forward to continuing our study of ImmunoPulse. We are pleased to see that a patient with progressive MCC, despite failing multiple other therapies, had a confirmed partial response with regression of even distant non-injected tumors. This creative immunotherapy approach to deliver DNA IL-12 directly into the tumors appears to be tolerated well and so far without any systemic side-effects.”

All five subjects treated at the time of this preliminary analysis had distant metastatic disease, and were eligible to receive up to two treatment cycles. Two subjects have withdrawn from the study with progressive disease, and only received one cycle of treatment. Three subjects completed the study and received both treatment cycles. To date, the treatment has been safe and well-tolerated, with treatment-related adverse events including transient grade 1 pain (n=5) and grade 1 injection site reaction (n=1) without any systemic or residual toxicity.

Punit Dhillon, President and CEO of OncoSec Medical, added, “These subset data are positive and validate the results seen in our previous clinical trial. Thus far studies have shown that the administration of IL-12 using electroporation safely results in efficient transfection of the agent and a marked increase in production of the IL-12 protein inside the tumor. These results represent the first human data for a gene therapy using in vivo electroporation in MCC patients, and is a positive step towards advancement of this program.”

About Merkel Cell Carcinoma

Merkel cell carcinoma is a rare and highly aggressive cancer, with approximately 1,500 new cases each year in the United States, in which malignant cancer cells develop on or just beneath the skin and in hair follicles. The majority of Merkel cell carcinomas appear to be caused in part by a virus, Merkel cell polyomavirus. If this cancer metastasizes to the lymph nodes, the five-year survival rate is about 50 percent. A patient with a small tumor (less than 2 cm) that has not metastasized to the lymph nodes may have a five-year survival rate of more than 80 percent. Current treatment options for these patients is surgery, radiation and chemotherapy; however, up to half of patients suffer a recurrence.

University of Washington To Become Fourth Enrolling Center in Trial 

SAN DIEGO, CA, September 25, 2012 — OncoSec Medical Inc. (OTCBB: ONCS), a company developing its advanced-stage ImmunoPulse DNA-based immunotherapy and NeoPulse therapy to treat solid tumor cancers, announced that it has established the University of Washington (UW) as the fourth enrolling site for its Phase II metastatic melanoma clinical trial (OMS-I100). Investigational Review Board (IRB) approval has been received by UW, and investigators are actively recruiting for this clinical trial.

“UW now joins the University of California, San Francisco, John Wayne Cancer Institute and Lakeland Cancer Center as our fourth site for the melanoma study,” said Punit Dhillon, President and CEO of OncoSec. “We have enjoyed working with UW and Dr. Shailender Bhatia for the Merkel cell carcinoma program, and look forward to having them join the melanoma trial as well.”

A total of up to 25 patients with stage III or IV cutaneous and in-transit metastatic melanoma will be enrolled in this Phase II, single-arm, open-label and multi-center study. The trial is designed to assess local and distant objective response following treatment of cutaneous melanoma lesions with DNA IL-12 and electroporation with a primary endpoint of 24 weeks. One treatment cycle will consist of three treatments applied to up to four lesions on days 1, 5 and 8 with a maximum dose of 1.5 mg DNA IL-12 per treatment cycle. At 12 months, patients will be moved to the follow-up phase of the study and will be followed for up to five years for safety.

Dr. Shailender Bhatia, principal investigator at UW, commented “We have had experience with this treatment in the Phase II Merkel cell carcinoma study, so we are glad to have the opportunity to now offer this treatment as an experimental therapy to the patients who are suffering from melanoma.”

ImmunoPulse utilizes OncoSec’s proprietary technology to deliver a DNA-based cytokine coded for the immune stimulating agent interleukin-12, or DNA IL-12. The OncoSec Medical System (OMS) applies short electric impulses to the tumor, causing pores to open in the membrane of cancer cells that significantly increases DNA IL-12 uptake into these cells. Phase I data using ImmunoPulse to treat malignant melanoma demonstrated that this therapy was safe and well tolerated. In addition, 53% of patients with distant metastatic lesions demonstrated an objective response, with 15% of these patients having a complete response to the treatment.

For more information about this trial visit: http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01502293.

About Melanoma

Melanoma is the most serious form of skin cancer. If it is recognized and treated early, it is almost always curable, but if it is not, the cancer can advance and spread to other parts of the body, where it becomes hard to treat and can be fatal. While it is not the most common of the skin cancers, it causes the most deaths. The American Cancer Society estimates that at present, about 123,000 new cases of melanoma in the US are diagnosed in a year, resulting in approximately 10,000 deaths. Melanoma originates in melanocytes, the cells which produce the pigment melanin that colors our skin, hair, and eyes. The majority of melanomas are black or brown, but often they can also be skin-colored, pink, red, purple, blue or white. Currently, there remains few treatment options for patients with late stage metastatic disease that can extend survival for the broad population.

 

 

Exclusive License Extends Patent Protection for ImmunoPulse Technology

SAN DIEGO – September 11, 2012 – OncoSec Medical Inc. (OTCBB: ONCS), a company developing its advanced-stage ImmunoPulse and NeoPulse therapies to treat solid tumor cancers, announced it has secured an exclusive license for specific patented technology from the University of South Florida Research Foundation (USFRF) relating to the delivery of gene-based therapeutics via intratumoral and intramuscular electroporation. This patent is directly related to the ongoing Phase II trials for metastatic melanoma, Merkel cell carcinoma and cutaneous T-cell lymphoma using the company’s ImmunoPulse therapy, and extends patent protection for the ImmunoPulse technology to the year 2024. Financial terms of this agreement were not disclosed.

OncoSec’s proprietary gene and drug delivery platform, the OncoSec Medical System (OMS) electroporation device, is currently being used to develop the company’s ImmunoPulse and NeoPulse therapies. This platform encompasses patents, technology and other intellectual property for intratumoral methods for delivering drugs and gene-based treatments in humans.

ImmunoPulse involves the application of a brief electric field to the surface of the skin. This temporarily opens pores in the cell membrane, allowing anti-cancer agent DNA IL-12, to be absorbed more efficiently. DNA IL-12, which normally has difficulty penetrating the tumor cell membrane to get inside these cells, has been shown to significantly stimulate the immune system’s T-cells to fight the cancer. The new license from USFRF complements OncoSec’s seminal patents, particularly for the protection of the methods involved in the ImmunoPulse treatment, and specifically for the use of DNA IL-12.

“Our licensing agreement with the USFRF significantly strengthens OncoSec’s intellectual property rights in the area of gene and drug delivery via in vivo electroporation,” said Punit Dhillon, OncoSec’s President and CEO. “We anticipate that the further development of this technology will enhance the ability of ImmunoPulse to address the serious unmet need among patients with skin cancer. OncoSec’s patent portfolio places us in a preeminent position within the field of electroporation-based delivery of gene-based treatments for cancer.”

“OncoSec is the ideal choice to further develop this technology that I and my colleagues pioneered while working at the University of South Florida, and I am pleased they have secured this license,” said Richard Heller, Ph.D., author of the patented technology. “The technology involves short-pulsed electric fields that can deliver plasmid DNA to stimulate the immune system. As a result, it is a natural fit with OncoSec’s ongoing program to develop its ImmunoPulse therapy.”

 

 

Data from previous Phase I study identifies that presence of novel antigens plus DNA IL-12 delivered using electroporation achieves stabilization and regression of treated and distant untreated melanoma tumors

SAN DIEGO, CA, June 7, 2011 — OncoSec Medical Incorporated (OTCBB: ONCS), which is developing its advanced-stage ElectroOncology therapies to treat solid tumor cancers, announced today that additional evaluation of a previous Phase I trial provided further evidence that a DNA plasmid encoded to produce IL-12 delivered by electroporation into melanoma lesions induces responses to known and novel antigens, resulting in regression of local treated lesions as well as distant untreated lesions. The results were presented by Dr. Adil Daud, principal investigator of the study, at the ASCO 2011 Annual Meeting.

In this Phase I trial, the experimental regimen was safe and well tolerated, with minimal systemic toxicity. Local treated lesions were biopsied and showed that 76% of all samples had at least 20% necrosis of the tumor, with 34% of those lesions showing 100% necrosis (clearance of the tumor). Furthermore, patients with additional tumors beyond the treated tumor were followed to determine regression of distant untreated lesions. Results demonstrated that 10 (53%) of 19 patients with distant untreated lesions showed at least stable disease or objective (partial or complete) regression. In addition, 15% of these patients demonstrated 100% clearance of distant, untreated metastatic melanoma tumors; by comparison, only 0.25% of such tumors would normally be expected to clear on their own if left untreated. The observed tumor regression of untreated lesions suggested a systemic immune response to the localized treatment. The data demonstrated a dose-dependent increase in intratumoral IL-12 protein expression and concomitant increases in intratumoral IFN-gamma. In addition, this study showed that electroporated tumors contained CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytic infiltrates in the treated lesions, further validating the ability of DNA IL-12 to up-regulate adaptive and innate immunity.

Following this Phase I study, the researchers conducted additional analysis into the ability of DNA IL-12 to induce a systemic immune response against distant metastatic lesions and more importantly to potentially identify blood markers that can be used to predict if a specific sub-set of patients is more likely to respond to DNA IL-12. Evaluable patients were categorized by tumor response (complete, partial response, stable disease or disease progression) and the researchers analyzed blood samples obtained at weeks 1, 4 and 6. Among numerous antigens tested and identified, two candidates, namely epidermally-localized protein (4.2-fold, p = 0.008) and a testis-restricted antigen (3.0-fold, p = 0.037), were present in subjects who displayed a significant differential in tumor response versus those that were non-responders. These results indicate that blood markers may exist that can predict whether patients will respond to treatment with DNA IL-12 with electroporation, further adding to the selective potential of this treatment.

Dr. Adil Daud, Clinical Professor of Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco, who led the exploratory study, said, “This first-in-man study demonstrated that local intratumoral electroporation of DNA IL-12 in melanoma induces systemic immune responses that can stabilize or cause regression of not only local treated but also distant untreated metastatic melanoma tumors. We are also pleased with this new analysis indicating that measurable blood markers may be useful in selecting patients more likely to respond to this treatment. These results provide significant encouragement that DNA-IL12 delivered with electroporation may represent an important new treatment against challenging cancers such as melanoma.”

Punit Dhillon, OncoSec’s President and CEO, said, “Melanoma is an aggressive skin cancer, and metastatic melanoma is generally lethal. Just stabilizing this disease is an accomplishment, but we are very enthusiastic about the results of this Phase I study showing regression of treated and untreated tumors, as well as the insights into potential new markers. We look forward to launching OncoSec’s planned three Phase II skin cancer trials this summer. Our goal is to further validate these results and show the breakthrough nature of this tissue-sparing, tumor killing drug/device cancer therapy.”

This data relates to OncoSec’s ElectroImmunotherapy using a DNA plasmid coding for IL-12 that is delivered using electroporation. Electroporation enables significant cellular uptake of the DNA IL-12, which then instructs the cells to produce the protein IL-12. IL-12 stimulates the release of cytotoxic T-cells, natural killer (NK) cells, and IFN-gamma, which in conjunction up-regulate the production of CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytic infiltrates, resulting in an immuno-reaction against cancers that leads to cancer cell death.

OncoSec has announced that it will initiate three Phase II clinical trials in the next several months to assess its ElectroImmunotherapy technology in patients with melanoma, Merkel cell carcinoma and cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. If OncoSec’s Phase II trials further validate the initial Phase I evidence, the DNA-based IL-12 ElectroImmunotherapy platform would represent an important advancement in the treatment of both local and metastatic cancers.

About Melanoma

The incidence of many common cancers is falling, but the incidence of melanoma continues to rise at a rate faster than that of any of the seven most common cancers. Between 1992 and 2004, melanoma incidence increased 45 percent, or 3.1 percent annually. An estimated 68,000 new cases of melanoma were diagnosed in the U.S. in 2010 – with nearly 8,700 resulting in death. Approximately 75 percent of skin cancer deaths are from melanoma. In 2004, the most recent figures available, the total direct medical cost associated with the treatment of skin cancer in the U.S. was $1.5 billion. Currently there are few treatment options for metastatic melanoma because of the aggressive nature of the disease. Current treatment approaches are associated with high morbidity and only marginal improvements in overall survival.

About OncoSec Medical Inc.

Oncosec Medical (OTCBB: ONCS) develops novel ElectroOncology therapies that combine its proprietary electroporation delivery technology with a chemotherapeutic or novel DNA-based immunotherapeutics. Targeted local delivery of these agents is designed to achieve selective destruction of cancerous tumors while sparing healthy normal tissue, resulting in improved functional, cosmetic and quality of life outcomes. These therapies have achieved validating safety and efficacy data in early and late stage clinical studies of over 400 cancer patients. OncoSec’s clinical programs include three Phase II clinical trials. More information is available at www.oncosec.com.

* * *
This press release contains forward looking statements within the meaning of the U.S. Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Any statements in this release that are not historical facts may be considered such “forward looking statements.” Forward looking statements are based on management’s current preliminary expectations and are subject to risks and uncertainties which may cause our results to differ materially and adversely from the statements contained herein. Some of the potential risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ from those predicted include our ability to raise additional funding, our ability to acquire, develop or commercialize new products, uncertainties inherent in pre-clinical studies and clinical trials, unexpected new data, safety and technical issues, competition and market conditions. These and additional risks and uncertainties are more fully described in OncoSec’s filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Undue reliance should not be placed on forward looking statements which speak only as of the date they are made. OncoSec disclaims any obligation to update any forward looking statements to reflect new information, events or circumstances after the date they are made, or to reflect the occurrence of unanticipated events.

SAN DIEGO, CA, June 2, 2011 — OncoSec Medical Incorporated (OTCBB: ONCS), which is developing its advanced-stage ElectroOncology therapies to treat solid tumor cancers, announced today that one of its clinical trial advisers will present results from an ElectroImmunotherapy clinical trial for melanoma at the 2011 American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting to be held June 4-8 at McCormick Place, Chicago, IL.

Dr. Adil Daud, a clinical trials adviser for Oncosec Medical, and Clinical Professor, Hematology/Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, will discuss trial results from a long-term, follow-up study of melanoma patients treated with DNA IL-12 delivered via electroporation. Dr. Daud will lead the following poster session:

Session: Developmental Therapeutics – Clinical Pharmacology and Immunotherapy
Discussion: “Systemic immune responses induced by intratumoral plasmid IL-12electroporation in patients with melanoma”
Monday, June 6, 8:00 AM to 12:00 PM

Location: McCormick Place Hall A

About 2011 ASCO Annual Meeting

More than 30,000 cancer specialists from around the world will gather at the 2011 ASCO Annual Meeting to discuss the latest innovations in research, quality, practice and technology in cancer. This meeting will be the platform for the release of important scientific abstracts — highly anticipated research news for many people, including patients, caregivers, and the general public. ASCO is a professional oncology society committed to conquering cancer through research, education, prevention and delivery of high quality patient care.

About OncoSec’s ElectroImmunotherapy and Electroporation Delivery

OncoSec’s ElectroImmunotherapy consists of a DNA-based cytokine delivered using electroporation. Consisting of a DNA plasmid (manufactured circles of DNA) coded to produce a specific cytokine such as IL-12, this DNA immunotherapeutic is injected into locally targeted tumors and surrounding tissue and followed by electroporation. This results in significant uptake of the agent by cells in this area of tissue. The DNA plasmid instructs these cells to “express” the protein it was designed to produce, such as IL-12. After the immune system detects the immunotherapeutic agent, it produces significant amounts of immune agents such as macrophages and killer T-cells that are able to kill cancerous cells.

Cytokine immunotherapeutics such as IL-12 have been directly injected in the form of proteins and have been shown to induce innate immune system responses capable of killing cancerous cells. Unfortunately they can also cause toxic side effects as the immune system perceives the proteins to be foreign. When DNA IL-12 is injected, the IL-12 produced by the body does not induce this unwanted immune response but has been shown to induce an immune response against cancer cells.

In these Phase II trials OncoSec will employ its in vivo electroporation device, or OncoSec Medical System (OMS), to enhance the potency of the DNA IL-12. The OMS consists of a pulse generator and handheld applicator with a sterile disposable array. The system delivers nano-second electrical pulses that increase cell membrane permeability, resulting in significant cellular uptake of the DNA plasmid and subsequent gene expression (i.e. production of the coded antigen). OMS can increase gene expression by 1000-fold and immune responses by 100 times or more compared to an un-enhanced delivery of a DNA plasmid.

About OncoSec Medical Inc.

Oncosec Medical (OTCBB: ONCS) develops novel ElectroOncology therapies that combine its proprietary electroporation delivery technology with a chemotherapeutic or novel DNA-based immunotherapeutics. Targeted local delivery of these agents is designed to achieve selective destruction of cancerous tumors while sparing healthy normal tissue, resulting in improved functional, cosmetic and quality of life outcomes. These therapies have achieved validating safety and efficacy data in early and late stage clinical studies of over 400 cancer patients. OncoSec’s clinical programs include three Phase II clinical trials. More information is available at www.oncosec.com.

* * *
This press release contains forward looking statements within the meaning of the U.S. Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Any statements in this release that are not historical facts may be considered such “forward looking statements.” Forward looking statements are based on management’s current preliminary expectations and are subject to risks and uncertainties which may cause our results to differ materially and adversely from the statements contained herein. Some of the potential risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ from those predicted include our ability to raise additional funding, our ability to acquire, develop or commercialize new products, uncertainties inherent in pre-clinical studies and clinical trials, unexpected new data, safety and technical issues, competition and market conditions. These and additional risks and uncertainties are more fully described in OncoSec’s filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Undue reliance should not be placed on forward looking statements which speak only as of the date they are made. OncoSec disclaims any obligation to update any forward looking statements to reflect new information, events or circumstances after the date they are made, or to reflect the occurrence of unanticipated events.


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