2013 Year in Review for OncoSec

Rodman & Renshaw Presentation Overview

This week, our CEO, Punit Dhillon, presented at the 15th Annual Rodman & Renshaw Global Investment Conference. The annual event hosted over 150 established and emerging biotech and pharmaceutical companies. During the presentation, Mr. Dhillon reviewed previous data points and provided an update on upcoming milestones. Here is an overview of the presentation:

Cancer Facts by OncoSec: Volume One

Across America and around the world, there are many researchers, scientists, medical professionals and other individuals working within the research and treatment of cancer. For many members of the public, the topic of cancer may only come up when someone around them is diagnosed. However, it is a good idea to know a bit more about cancer, in order to lower your risk and understand just how important cancer facts can be.

Here are a few quick cancer facts that you should know:

OncoSec’s “What We’re Reading”: Volume 2

Each week at OncoSec, we come across a wide range of news material. This week, we continue our “What We’re Reading” series, with our second instalment. There have been quite a number of recent articles regarding cancer, the biotech industry and treatment methods but we would like to highlight three that you might find interesting and informative.

Inspiring Cancer Survivors: Volume 2

At OncoSec, we believe it’s important to highlight those striving to fight against cancer. We especially like to share stories about inspiring cancer survivors who have helped to raise awareness, to educate others about cancer risk, and who have raised funds or started cancer advocacy initiatives of their own. In our ongoing Inspiring Cancer Survivors series, we would like to present you with volume two: three amazing youth cancer survivors who have helped others through cancer.

Chemotherapy, Radiation Therapy and Immunotherapy

With the severity of many cancer cases, the treatment of cancer is regarded as a very sensitive area. Strict regulations surround the research and delivery of treatment, there are specific protocols used by doctors in diagnosis, and long established doctrine often governs which treatment option is used. Because of these factors, a few cornerstone treatments have surfaced over the years, which still make up the majority of treatments. The two options used most often, aside from surgery for early-stage tumors, are chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Today, we take a look at each therapy method and compare them to immunotherapy.

Why does OncoSec use Immunotherapy?

In biotech, there are many different approaches or veins of science used, in the research and creation of potential treatments, drugs, and delivery methods. For centuries, the health industry has relied on invasive surgery and curative procedures that can have dangerous, long-term side effects for patients. However, there are some newer scientific discoveries that have allowed us to move towards more effective treatment options that are also less damaging to our bodies. One of these categories of research is that of immunotherapy: using the body against disease, instead of relying on as many non-targeted, exterior factors.

Clinical Trials, Data, and Staging

The biotech and medical industries have come a long way. While many marvels have been created – such as vaccines, treatments and prosthetics – some of the research could pose dangers to the public, if it is not used correctly or if the initial findings from early experimentation are wrong. It is for these reasons that the FDA requires proper clinical testing (or clinical trials) to be performed, before they are eligible for public use. We would like to explore what exactly a clinical trial is, the data they collect and how a clinical trial moves on to the next phase:

Misconceptions about Clinical Trials

Clinical trials are a requirement, for any new drug or treatment method attempting to gain approval for public use. The process is meant to show the effectiveness, safety, stability and repeatable nature of the proposed treatment, in order to prove that it works. Clinical trials are a long, intensive process that takes years and millions of dollars to complete. In fact, it is believed that the average drug costs $1.3 billion, to bring it to the point of sale, and as much as $11 billion.

What is ImmunoPulse?

Many cancer research and treatment companies create and utilize various methods of treatment. These may be a combination of existing techniques or a new technology developed by the company itself. At OncoSec, one of our treatment methods is ImmunoPulse: a system we’re testing for the treatment of late-stage skin cancer, including merkel cell carcinoma, cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, and metastatic melanoma. With pending announcements surrounding interim data from our phase II trial for metastatic melanoma coming up soon, we would like to review a bit of the description of our ImmunoPulse treatment option currently being tested.

At OncoSec, we find it important to help the public to understand how cancer treatments work. Just as there are many different types of cancer, so too are there various treatment methods for combatting the disease. Alongside these treatments, there lies an important part of medical procedures that doesn’t get talked about often enough: delivery mechanisms. These are the techniques for getting the curative material into the body in the first place. Today, we would like to look at four unique, experimental delivery methods being used in the fight against cancer.


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